You Bombed the Interview

Poor performance in the interview is one of the most common reasons why people don't get jobs. If you think that you bombed the interview, then there is a high probability that it was due to one or more of the following sub-reasons:

  • You were unprepared for the interview and did not know about the company.
  • Your body language indicated negative attitudes about what was going to happen.
  • Your facial expressions did not inspire confidence or comfort
  • Your answers to the questions were not exactly what the employer was looking for.

Your Resume Did Not Stick To the Job Requirement

You may have asked for a salary higher than what the company was willing to pay. Or you may have requested for a position that was out of your sphere of responsibility or expertise. So, it can be said that you failed because you didn't stick to the job requirement, or your skills and capabilities were not match with what was necessary for the role in question.

In other words, you should personalize your resume to the job applied and what you say in the interview should remain consistent throughout.

You really should take serious time + effort to prepare for an interview (like, really properly plan, sit down and prepare).
How You Can Practice for An Interview
Understand Your Employer’s Needs | Chill Those Tense Nerves | Know your competition & Defeat them | Do not skip interview relaxation - breathe in, breathe out | Practice for an interview one week ahead

You Did Not Return Calls, Emails or Follow Up After the Interview

It is okay if you lost connectivity after the interview, but it is not acceptable if you did not return any calls or emails from them. If the interviewer didn't give you a call or an email within 6 weeks (or more if necessary) then find it suspicious. Call them up or mail them an email and make sure that you received their feedback on your performance in person. Failure to do so can be one of the reasons why you didn't get their job offer.

Writing a Post-Interview Follow Up Email
• Why Job Seekers & Employers Should Follow Up• For Interviewees: What Should I Write?• A Full Sample of Interviewee’s Email• Interviewer’s Response• Sending Out Handwritten Notes

You Didn't Show Up to the Interview

Maybe it was for personal or family reasons, or that there was something unexpected which cropped up at home. Or maybe you were uncomfortable with the business and not really sure what you wanted to do in that position. So, you skipped the interview and did not reschedule it. For these reasons, your failure to get a job stems from your own inability to handle and deal with the unexpected.

How Do I Miss An Interview?
• Your Needs Come First • White Lies Save You from Future Pain• If You Are Nervous• Reasonable, Excusable Excuses• A Courtesy Call is Always Appreciated• Going MIA is the Worst Outcome

You didn't do your homework about the company

Whatever you did not do, or did not do well, cost you the job. If it was a bad interview, it might have been due to ignorance. When you are hired for a job you would want to work in, make sure that you do your homework before meeting the employer or manager in person.

Content to Include & Exclude in My Resume
∙ Use Descriptive Section Headers∙ Personalize Your Application with A Cover Letter∙ How Long Should a Resume Be?∙ Formatting a Resume: Using Templates, Font Size & Text Positioning

Other Candidates Applied Earlier

The interviewer already processed several other candidates and saw one of them as a good fit for the position. Competition is the keyword here. You need to prepare yourself better than the other candidates if you want to make a difference, and not only that, complete the entire job application submission before them to beat them out.

You can't apply late and think you still have the same fighting chance.

You Did Not Really Want the Job

If you never had any intention of accepting the job, it doesn't matter whether or not you were prepared for the interview. The interviewer is going to see through this ruse when he sees that your motivation is not real. To get a job that you really want, keep in mind what your real objective is, and go after it whole-heartedly.

Your Resume Contains Errors or an Outdated Version of It is on Your Computer

Sometimes, file naming convention (a.k.a. how you name your PDF documents) can cause your downfall. A similarly named "Tom_Resume5.pdf" and "Tom_Resume6.pdf" looks the same but how do you know that Resume 5 isn't the latest and most updated one? It could be the reason why your latest version of your resume isn't being found by the company's HR department. This can also happen if you use an old version of a resume and presented it to a company which perceived it to not fit the requirements. When in fact you are, but you didn't submit to newest copy.

Your Degree Is Not Exactly What They Need

If you have a degree in Philosophy, but you are applying for a manager's position, chances are that you are not going to get it. The same thing happens when you have a degree and the job requires a skill set that you don't have. It is called a mismatch. Make sure to research thoroughly about your target employer's requirements before submitting your application for any job.

Your resume is too long or it isn't appealing to the company's audience

Don't feel that all jobs are alike. Some companies do have specific requirements that make it difficult for the applicants who don't meet those requirements to get a job. It is part of what you need to know before going through the hiring process. Make sure to create a resume that is personalized, not too long and appealing to the employer's audience. Keep it succinct and to the point.