Despite knowing fierce and invasive questioning should not happen, you got sucked in, it happened and now you are worried about consequences. Biased opinion, unfair employment concerns, maybe a hint of possible identity theft with a whiff of fear from spreading poisonous rumors may come to mind. Bothered? Troubled? Let's clear your mind.


Interviews Are Two-Way Conversational Traffic

Both parties at the meet up should be keen to know more about each other (like a date!)

There should have been conversations on many topics. Questions. Talks to see if you fit them and for you to see if they fit you.

You are not a circus monkey for your interviewer. Don't be suppressed.
The interviewer is not your audience. You are not a parading, dancing monkey.

Remember, you are not here to perform or act. Interviews are a matchmake and compatibility session. You have every right to ask, question and hammer at their heads (figuratively) as they have.

Likely you were prepared for the common questions, but their bombardment of nearly interrogative questions took you by surprise

Most Common Interview Questions & How to Answer Them
• Give a 30 Second Introduction• Why You Think You Are Qualified• Initiative & Goals• What Others Say About You• What Kind of Person Are You• Why Did You Quit


Skip, If The Interview Hasn't Happened Yet

If the interview is upcoming and you haven't gone down for the meeting yet, it can be better to give the interview a miss. These kinds of employers, bosses and probably coworkers too aren't worth your time at best. And at worst, you could be jumping in head-first into a really toxic environment.

Consider skipping the interview.

There are other jobs out there. Alternative opportunities that can be way better.

How Do I Miss An Interview?
• Your Needs Come First • White Lies Save You from Future Pain• If You Are Nervous• Reasonable, Excusable Excuses• A Courtesy Call is Always Appreciated• Going MIA is the Worst Outcome

Post-Interview Mortem

What's done is done.

No use crying over spilt milk. Now is the time to recollect and write down every, single, thing you've shared and over-shared in the interview.

Count the beans spilled.

You've already leaked info, more than you are possibly comfortable with. By tabulating the info, you end up assessing the "net" destructive force of your own words.

You can't take back words after you've overshared.

Chances of Bad Leaks

Use probability and care less about the worse case scenario.

Spreading falsehoods take time and effort. Info you find juicy 🍑 may not be juicy to the ears of others. Why? Have you played pass the message using the string and cup game? Meaning gets distorted as words are relayed from person to person. And in our case here, if the info is seen to be news-worthy or potentially useful (or destructive) to the receiving party then info is unlikely to be disseminated out.

Consider which piece of info could be a real threat to you. Then give it a percentage % chance that info will go out.

Cut Your Losses

Zip that lip of yours. Maybe play dumb if they call back and ask for confirmation of facts. Should they throw fresh punches at you in a followup interview - detract, deny and disassociate yourself from the unhealthy.

Painful lessons learned today are painful consequences avoided tomorrow.

Try to change the topic away from these rubbish questions.

20 Things You Should Never Discuss in an Interview
• “I have a family to support”• “I don’t feel I can commit to anything right now.”• “I have another job offer”• “My boss is a jerk”• “I’m graduating, so I can pretty much take a year off”• “Yes, I’m planning on moving away next year...”